Greyhound Racing Tracks

Greyhound Racing Tracks

Listing Greyhound racing tracks and clubs from around the world, including Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Macau, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The listings include the names, addresses and telephone numbers of the Greyhound racing tracks and clubs.

Greyhound Racing Tracks

The History of Greyhound Racing

Greyhound racing was introduced to Britain by the American, Owen Patrick Smith. He had created the very first mechanical lure to run around a circular track, way back in 1925. Charles Munn, a businessman with an eye for the future, saw potential in the sport and set about promoting it in the United Kingdom, along with Brigadier-General Alfred Critchley, and Sir William Gentle. Together they formed the GRA (Greyhound Racing Association), and tracks were quickly erected around the country. Within weeks, crowds of over 10,000 people were coming to see the races. Very soon, the simple new sport would become a national favourite. The 50s and 60s saw the sport increase dramatically, and in 2009, a new organisation took over the operation, known as the Greyhound Board of Great Britain. Today, 26 licensed Greyhound tracks exist (25 in England, 1 in Scotland), and although it is not as popular as in decades gone by, Greyhound Racing is still hugely wagered on sports, amidst sports betting fans.

How to bet on Greyhound Racing

Generally, betting on Greyhound racing isn’t really any different than betting on horse racing. The first thing you must do is either make your way to the Greyhound racing track, visit a bookmakers outlet, or sign into an online sportsbook via your computer, laptop or mobile gaming device (phones or tablets). From there, you can select venues and races, and pick out the dogs that you think will win. Your bet is paid out as odds, once you have determined how much you wish to wager, what kind of bet and of course, on which dogs.

The types of bets

Just like horse racing, there are plenty of different types of bets that you can make in Greyhound racing. The most common bet is a Win Only bet. Naturally, this bet pays off if you pick the Greyhound to win the race. The Place Only bet is used to bet on a dog to finish first or second. A Forecast bet is when you pick two Greyhounds to finish first and second. The Reversed Forecast is a hugely popular bet, as it means your two Greyhounds can finish first or second in any order.

A Trio or Trifecta bet is pretty much the same kind of bet as a Forecast bet, although you must pick the first three dogs to cross the finish line. Combination Bets are trickier, and cover two, three or four Greyhounds. Combination bets work as multiple bets, but all on one ticket. Combination bets require a lot of “stats and homework” skill from the player, if they are to come off. In short, you really need to know your Greyhounds!

Finally, Speciality bets are also taken at Greyhound races. Jackpots are usually offered by the venues, and these are usually split over more than one race. Information regarding these is often available at the actual venue, at trackside. These special bets can contain everything and anything, and the there is no one way to define their offerings. The simplest way is to appear at the event, or to check your favourite bookmakers to ask about what Speciality bets they have for a specific race.